Home Artificial Intelligence Do More Games Mean More Wins? A Thought Experiment Designing the Approach The Results Implications Conclusion Thanks!

Do More Games Mean More Wins? A Thought Experiment Designing the Approach The Results Implications Conclusion Thanks!

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Do More Games Mean More Wins?
A Thought Experiment
Designing the Approach
The Results
Implications
Conclusion
Thanks!

Quick Success Data Science

They’ll in college football

Towards Data Science
Photo by Dave Adamson on Unsplash

I actually have an obnoxious friend who likes to brag about his alma mater’s gridiron team every likelihood he gets. Over the previous few years, his team won more regular-season games (by one game) than ever before. Now he’s crowing about it, comparing (way) back to his school’s glory years. There’s only one problem; back within the Nineteen Fifties and 60s, teams played only 10 regular season games.

Within the Nineteen Seventies, this increased to 11.

In 2006, it increased to 12.

Winning 9 out of 10 games in 1960 yielded a winning percentage of 90%. Winning 10 out of 12 today yields only 83%. So, winning 10 games is just not as great because it sounds.

But there’s more to it than this. What if the additional games are, on average, easier wins? That makes breaking old records even less impressive.

The good thing about data science is that you don’t must argue over things you may prove. data scientist should give you the chance to think analytically and marshal data to their cause.

In this text, we’ll evaluate the importance of playing more games on winning more games. It will involve universal data science practices, equivalent to formulating a premise, designing the evaluation, choosing appropriate data, and presenting the outcomes.

Specifically, we’ll evaluate the impact of fixing from 11 regular season games to 12 games. To smooth out the consequences of coaching changes and always evolving rules and regulations, we’ll use my friend’s alma mater and five other schools with similar football traditions, throughout 34 seasons straddling 2006.

Before we start, let’s do a thought experiment. If a university football powerhouse school (equivalent to Alabama, Ohio State, or Oklahoma) adds a random team to their schedule, they are going to probably win this extra game, as they’re stronger than most other teams.

Likewise, bottom-rung teams with little football tradition could be expected to lose this extra game, as most other teams are higher than they’re.

Theoretically, teams in the center would — assuming they drew randomly from the full roster of teams — win this extra game about half the time. This may lead to an average improvement to their record of 0.5 games per season, all things being equal. Thus, there can be years after they have the opportunity of winning not less than one game more than they’ve historically.

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